Policy Statements & Briefs

CBIE’s policy papers and briefs seek to provide solutions-oriented positions and analysis on emerging issues in international education. They are aimed at government officials and our membership alike, both in Canada and abroad. These papers may be collaborations with our members or other organizations, or contributions to publications by CBIE members on international education public policy.

CBIE Submission to the Government of Canada’s National Conversation on Immigration, August 2016

Read CBIE’s submission which addresses four areas:

  • Strengthening our Canadian fabric
  • Unlocking Canada’s diverse needs
  • Modernizing our immigration system
  • Leadership in global migration and immigration

CBIE Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance, Pre-Budget Consultations, August 2016

Read CBIE’s submission which requests substantial investment in the following area:

  • Investment in study abroad  for Canadian students “Canada’s Global Engagement Challenge” to make measurable progress toward the target of 50,000 awards annually by 2022

CBIE Submission to Global Affairs Canada on Canada’s International Assistance Policy Review, July 2016

Read CBIE’s submission which proposes four concrete recommendations that correspond to the input received from its members, as well as its own experience as a key development partner to the Government of Canada.


CBIE Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance, Pre-Budget Consultations, August 2014

Read CBIE’s submission which requests substantial investment in the following area:

  • Investment in study abroad  for Canadian students  “Canada’s Global Engagement Challenge” to make measurable progress toward the target of 50,000 awards annually by 2022

CBIE Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance, Pre-Budget Consultations, August 2013

Read CBIE’s submission which requests substantial investment in the following three areas:

  • Investment in study abroad for Canadian students;
  • Investment in collaborative international partnerships between educational institutions; and
  • Investment in the international promotion of education in Canada.

CBIE RESPONSE TO CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION CANADA: PROPOSED CHANGES TO INTERNATIONAL STUDENT PROGRAM, FEBRUARY 13, 2013

CBIE’s letter appears below. Read our recommendations here.

I am writing on behalf of the membership of the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE) in response to the proposed regulatory changes relating to international students, published in the Canada Gazette on December 29, 2012.

CBIE is Canada’s national organization exclusively dedicated to international education. Our membership spans the spectrum of Canadian education from K-12 through to postgraduate. Our partnerships encompass national and provincial associations and government departments. Our mission is to make Canada a global leader in international education.

CBIE appreciates CIC’s commitment to ensuring the integrity of Canada’s International Student Program (ISP) within a welcoming approach to qualified, bona fide international students attending genuine educational institutions. CIC plays a critical role in Canada’s performance as a host country for international students and its efforts to enhance our position are greatly valued.

CBIE has an expert Immigration Advisory Committee that is representative of our members from coast-to-coast and of the range of institution types. Earlier, our Committee prepared a number of key messages that were shared with all member institutions. Having now seen a number of the institutional submissions, it is clear that these messages resonated with them.

We believe that you will find our recommendations supportive of the objectives of the regulatory changes. Several suggest changes in language for purposes of clarity. Others are more substantive, for example, seeking to recognize that secondary school and pathways programs are increasingly important components of international education in Canada. As we noted in our letter last July in response to the notice of proposed changes, a third of international post-secondary students in CBIE’s 2009 national survey said that they had studied either at a Canadian secondary or language school prior to entering a Canadian college or university.

We appreciate CIC’s consultative approach over the past few months. Our Immigration Advisory Committee members took part in meetings in several provinces. CBIE and our partners in the Canadian Consortium for International Education Marketing (CCIEM) appreciated the opportunity to provide views during the meeting held last week in Ottawa.

Moreover the Consortium values our ongoing relationship with CIC. We believe that discussion of issues and possible solutions in our quarterly forum will be even more important once the regulations are finalized and signed into law, and when implementation takes centre stage.

As noted in the attached Comments and Recommendations document, we understand that a Working Group will be established to examine operationalization issues. We would be pleased to contribute our expertise to this effort.

In closing, CBIE values its partnership with CIC and looks forward to continued dialogue in support of our shared goals in international student policy and practice.


International Student Mobility Charter, September 2012

CBIE is a member of the Network of International Education Associations (NIEA). The European Association for International Education (EAIE) organized a working group, including CBIE, that developed this Charter. CBIE urges our members to consider the Charter in developing their own international education strategies, as a helpful addition to the guidance provided by our own Code of Ethical Practice.

Read the International Student Mobility Charter.


CBIE Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance, Pre-Budget Consultations, August 2012.

Read CBIE’s submission which covers the five areas requested by the Committee:

  • Economic Recovery and Growth
  • Job Creation
  • Demographic Change
  • Productivity
  • Other Challenges

CBIE RESPONSE TO CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION CANADA: PROPOSED CHANGES TO INTERNATIONAL STUDENT PROGRAM, JULY 26, 2012

CBIE’s letter appears below. Read the annex.

CBIE is Canada’s national organization exclusively dedicated to international education. Our membership spans the spectrum of Canadian education from K-12 through to postgraduate. Our partnerships encompass likeminded national and provincial associations and government departments. Our mission commits us to making Canada a global leader in international education.

CBIE appreciates CIC’s commitment to ensuring the integrity of Canada’s International Student Program (ISP) within a welcoming approach to qualified, bona fide international students attending genuine educational institutions. CIC plays a critical role in Canada’s performance as a host country for international students and its efforts to enhance our position are highly valued.

Moreover we appreciate CIC’s consultative approach. CBIE and our partners in the Canadian Consortium for International Education Marketing (CCIEM), who have also submitted a response, possess a wealth of expertise as well as the capacity to rapidly gather input from our large membership networks. As a result of our communications following the June 30 publication of the Notice of Intent, numerous member institutions have responded directly to you. We welcome the opportunity to provide further support to CIC consultations as you move forward.

We look forward to participating in discussions on institutional eligibility to host international students on study permits, as referenced in the Notice. As a starting point, we urge an approach that is focused on inclusion, recognizing that a range of quality options is a hallmark of Canada’s value proposition in international education. The Notice recognizes the importance of facilitating pathways to further education in Canada; indeed, a third of international post-secondary students in our latest national survey indicated that they had studied either at secondary or language school in Canada earlier in their academic career. At the same time we recognize that pan-Canadian criteria are needed to protect both individual students and Canada’s education brand. We invite CIC to use our 2012 annual conference, November 4-7 in Montréal, as a key consultation venue.

Policy coherence in regard to international students is critical if we are to achieve our national objectives vis-à-vis talent development and retention. A vital consideration for CIC is the alignment of student immigration regulations with Canada’s International Education Strategy. CBIE urges that CIC revisit the overall ISP in the context of the report of the Expert Panel to be released over the coming weeks.

CBIE has consulted our national Immigration Advisory Committee whose membership comprises substantial expertise on immigration policy and regulations pertaining to international students. While supportive of the intent of the changes proposed, the Committee urges that care be taken in their operationalization in order to avert unintended consequences. Attached is a set of discussion points that we hope CIC will find useful as it pursues the process towards regulatory changes.

In closing, CBIE values its partnership with CIC and looks forward to continued dialogue in support of our shared goals in international student policy and practice.


IAU: ”Affirming Academic Values in Internationalization of Higher EDUCATION: A CALL TO ACTION”, June 2012.

The IAU has issued a Call to Action. CBIE encourages members to consider the issues raised in the Call to Action, which will be a key discussion at our 2012 conference.


CBIE Submission to the Advisory Panel on Canada’s International Education Strategy, November 2011.

Excerpt: The overarching objective of Canada’s international education strategy should be to position Canada as a global leader in international education. And in order to claim a global leadership role in international education, Canada’s international education strategy must be underpinned by core values: quality, innovation, inclusiveness, partnership and sustainability.

The implementation of Canada’s international education strategy must therefore be a multifaceted approach that focuses not only on recruiting full-fee paying international students to Canada — at all levels — but also providing a global education to Canadian students, expanding scholarship opportunities so the best and brightest international students can benefit from a Canadian education, and working in partnership with foreign institutions for mutual benefit.

Moreover, the implementation of Canada’s international education strategy must leverage the complementary strengths of all key actors involved in mounting a successful effort: the federal government (in particular DFAIT and CIC, but also with a whole-of-government perspective); provincial/territorial governments; and the education sector itself — the institutions across the education spectrum that deliver the high-quality learning opportunities and the associations that actively support their efforts.